Services / Radiology

CT & MRI

we do have affiliations to provide hassle free services to patients and candidates. CT and MRI. Two high technology methods of creating images of internal organs. Computerized axial tomography (CT or CAT) uses x rays, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses magnet fields and radio-frequency signals.

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We do have affiliations to provide hassle free services to patients and candidates.

CT

A computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan allows doctors to see inside your body. It uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create pictures of your organs, bones, and other tissues. It shows more detail than a regular X-ray.

You can get a CT scan on any part of your body. The procedure doesn't take very long, and it's painless.

How Do CT Scans Work?

They use a narrow X-ray beam that circles around one part of your body. This provides a series of images from many different angles. A computer uses this information to create a cross-sectional picture. Like one piece in a loaf of bread, this two-dimensional (2D) scan shows a “slice” of the inside of your body.

This process is repeated to produce a number of slices. The computer stacks these scans one on top of the other to create a detailed image of your organs, bones, or blood vessels. For example, a surgeon may use this type of scan to look at all sides of a tumor to prepare for an operation.

What Is It Used For?

01

CT scans can detect bone and joint problems, like complex bone fractures and tumors.

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If you have a condition like cancer, heart disease, emphysema, or liver masses, CT scans can spot it or help doctors see any changes.

03

They show internal injuries and bleeding, such as those caused by a car accident.

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They can help locate a tumor, blood clot, excess fluid, or infection..

05

Doctors use them to guide treatment plans and procedures, such as biopsies, surgeries, and radiation therapy.

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Doctors can compare CT scans to find out if certain treatments are working. For example, scans of a tumor over time can show whether it’s responding to chemotherapy or radiation.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems provide highly detailed images of tissue in the body. The systems detect and process the signals generated when hydrogen atoms, which are abundant in tissue, are placed in a strong magnetic field and excited by a resonant magnetic excitation pulse.

Hydrogen atoms have an inherent magnetic moment as a result of their nuclear spin. When placed in a strong magnetic field, the magnetic moments of these hydrogen nuclei tend to align. Simplistically, one can think of the hydrogen nuclei in a static magnetic field as a string under tension. The nuclei have a resonant or "Larmor" frequency determined by their localized magnetic field strength, just as a string has a resonant frequency determined by the tension on it. For hydrogen nuclei in a typical 1.5T MRI field, the resonant frequency is approximately 64MHz.

Significance

MRI imaging requires the patient to be placed in a strong magnetic field in order to align the hydrogen nuclei. There are typically three methods to generate this field: fixed magnets, resistive magnets (current passing through a traditional coil of wire), and super-conducting magnets. Fixed magnets and resistive magnets are generally restricted to field strengths below 0.4T and cannot generate the higher field strengths typically necessary for high-resolution imaging. As a result, most high-resolution imaging systems use super- conducting magnets. The super-conducting magnets are large and complex; they need the coils to be soaked in liquid Helium to reduce their temperature to a value close to absolute zero.

The magnetic fields generated by these methods must not only be strong, but also highly uniform in space and stable in time. A typical system must have less than 10ppm variation over the imaging area. To achieve this accuracy, most systems generate weaker static magnetic fields using specialized shim coils to "shim" or "tweak" the static field from the super conductor and thereby correct for field inaccuracies.

CT vs MRI

01

CT scans and MRIs are both used to capture images within your body.

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The biggest difference is that MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging) use radio waves and CT (computed tomography) scans use X-rays.

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While both are relatively low risk, there are differences that may make each one a better option depending on the circumstances.

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CT scans are more widely used than MRIs and are typically less expensive.

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MRIs, however, are thought to be superior in regards to the detail of the image. The most notable difference is that CT scans use X-rays while MRIs do not.

06

Other differences between MRI and CT scans include their risks and benefits.

Risks

01

Both CT scans and MRIs pose some risks when used. The risks are based on the type of imaging as well as how the imaging is performed.

02

CT scan risks include

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Harm to unborn babies

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A very small dose of radiation

05

A potential reaction to the use of dyes

06

MRI risks include.

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Possible reactions to metals due to magnets

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Loud noises from the machine causing hearing issues

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Increase in body temperature during long MRIs

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Claustrophobia

You should consult a doctor prior to an MRI if you have implants including:

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Artificial joints

03

Eye implants

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An IUD

05

A pacemaker

Benefits

01

Both MRIs and CT scans can view internal body structures. However, a CT scan is faster and can provide pictures of tissues, organs, and skeletal structure.

02

An MRI is highly adept at capturing images that help doctors determine if there are abnormal tissues within the body. MRIs are more detailed in their images.

Choosing between an MRI and CT scan

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Most likely, your doctor will give you a recommendation based on your symptoms whether you should get an MRI or CT scan.

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If you need a more detailed image of your soft tissue, ligaments, or organs, your doctor will commonly suggest an MRI.

Such cases include:

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Herniated disks

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Torn ligaments

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Soft tissue issues

If you need a general image of an area like your internal organs, or due to a fracture or head trauma, a CT scan will commonly be recommended.

Takeaway

01

While there are more risks associated with MRI scans, both CT scans and MRI scans are relatively low risk. Both offer important information to help your doctor properly diagnose specific conditions.

02

Most likely, your doctor will tell you which one they recommend. Be sure to ask questions and discuss any concerns with your doctor, so you can be comfortable with the choice they recommend.

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